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Seattlenin

10 Oct

In Seattle's Fremont neighborhood, a statue of Lenin, relocated from Czechoslovakia in 1993. Washington resident Lewis Carpenter, teaching English abroad, saw artistic value in the monument and rescued it from a scrapyard, paid for it, plus shipping costs, and had it moved to Seattle. The following year, Carpenter was killed in a car accident and ownership of the statue moved to his family, who arranged to have it placed in Fremont. The placement is temporary, as the family is still seeking a buyer.(CC BY SA/Chris Yunker)

In Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood, a statue of Lenin, relocated from Czechoslovakia in 1993. Washington resident Lewis Carpenter, teaching English abroad, saw artistic value in the monument and rescued it from a scrapyard, paid for it, plus shipping costs, and had it moved to Seattle. The following year, Carpenter was killed in a car accident and ownership of the statue moved to his family, who arranged to have it placed in Fremont. The placement is temporary, as the family is still seeking a buyer.(CC BY SA/Chris Yunker) #


Unsurprising that Seattle would have a Lenin statue, in light of this, this, this, this, and all that Eric has shared about his city…

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16 responses to “Seattlenin

  1. prsTM

    October 10, 2014 at 10:37 am

    To be fair, most people – even those living in Fremont – don’t take the statue seriously. Other political criticisms of Seattle are richly deserved.

     
  2. Will S.

    October 10, 2014 at 10:56 am

    That’s good. But the fact remains, the powers-that-be in Fremont allowed it to be placed in what looks like a public square of some kind, maybe a park (though I see little green).

     
  3. Chillingworth

    October 10, 2014 at 12:11 pm

    Right, if it has to be rescued from the junkyard, a museum (perhaps in an exhibit about the failed ideologies of the last century) would be a more appropriate place for it.

    There is something appropriately ironic, though, about this monument to an idol of Communism, abandoned by the people it had been imposed on, rescued by capitalism, but then still unable to find a buyer.

     
    • Will S.

      October 10, 2014 at 12:12 pm

      It is amusing, indeed. 🙂

       
  4. ray

    October 10, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    So, the Czechs dumped the little punk just as soon as they could (i.e., as soon as the Kremlin was off their backs). And now he’s a (perfectly descriptive) symbol of Seattle and New Amerika, neither of whom desire to remove this symbol of communist totalitarianism, but instead fete it in public.

    If you’ll look beside Vlad the Rad’s left (sinister) hand, you will the see organizational method by which this came about in the U.S. over the past two centuries of incrementalism . . . and by which America and the West was infiltrated and conquered by all other secular ‘progress’, including feminism and PC. That’d be the masonic lodge, with its attractive and inviting symbolism. And its panoptic Eye. The true founders and controllers of this land, even from before its formal founding.

    But then, what could I know? I’m just a conspiracy nut who doesn’t really understand these complex issues.

     
  5. Will S.

    October 10, 2014 at 6:12 pm

    I know about the Masons, and how Washington D.C. was designed by Pierre L’Enfant, a Mason architect, and how its layout follows Masonic design principles, etc.

    I know how Washington, Jefferson and Franklin were Masons, and how the American Revolution was basically a Masonic project.

     
  6. The Karamazov Idea

    October 10, 2014 at 6:38 pm

    The following year, Carpenter was killed in a car accident

    Every time I start to think God isn’t real.

     
  7. Will S.

    October 10, 2014 at 6:39 pm

    Exactly! 🙂

     
  8. Eric

    October 10, 2014 at 8:11 pm

    I’m not sure people don’t take it seriously here:

    Quite a few political rallies get held around it. I remember reading media editorials at the time the City placed in the park praising their decision to honor the great man and all he stood for. And these editorials were written by local college professors, too.

     
  9. Eric

    October 10, 2014 at 8:14 pm

    As a side note, the article was incorrect about one thing: the original purchaser brought it from Czechoslovakia because he owned a Russian restaurant and wanted to display it in the courtyard. It wasn’t because of its artistic merit.

     
  10. Will S.

    October 10, 2014 at 8:34 pm

    Interesting.

     
  11. Will S.

    October 10, 2014 at 8:35 pm

    Figures.

     
  12. feeriker

    October 11, 2014 at 1:41 am

    …as the family is still seeking a buyer

    Rumor has it that our current Sockpuppet-in-Chief has made an offer for it; he wants it placed behind the Awful Orifice desk.

     
  13. Will S.

    October 11, 2014 at 9:35 am

    🙂

     
  14. ray

    October 11, 2014 at 4:36 pm

    The French, Russian, and American ‘revolutions’ certainly were masonic projects. But so is feminism, p.c., and essentially every aspect of the modern secular State-Church. What some of you guys call the Cathedral.

    Not all of the Founding Fathers of the U.S., of course, were lodge-members. They were a fairly diverse group, but the masonic operatives directed the core of the Founding, and America’s subsequent direction. From long before any formal independence Declaration.

    That photo speaks the truth — inadvertently. The U.S. can’t hide from the truth, any more than it can hide from the Lord.

     

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