RSS

Springtime festivity spheres…

13 Jan

… Newspeak for ‘Easter Egg’, apparently.

*Update: Or just ‘spring spheres’, in Seattle…

Evidently, Quebec is following its parent country France, way down the totalitarian secularization path; where France has banned public displays of crucifixes in schools, Quebec daycare centres – even private ones – will likewise be banned from having religious prayers, crafts and songs, including Christmas carols, if the Quebec government has its way.

Quebec government totalitarianism in everyday life is of course nothing new, by any means, whether in matters linguistic or religious.  Thankfully, the days of padlocking the temples of JWs are long gone.  But this is a bad step back in the same direction…

P.S. In a completely unrelated story, apparently Quebec anglos are outliving francophones.  French-Canadians may believe in the joie de vivre, but they don’t get to vivre as long. 😉

Advertisements
 
18 Comments

Posted by on January 13, 2012 in Canada, government, The Decline, The Kulturkampf

 

18 responses to “Springtime festivity spheres…

  1. Cranberry

    January 13, 2012 at 8:24 am

    I don’t know why Canadians think they are so awesome and tolerant, when it seems like they are anything but. Sorry, Will, I know it’s your homeland (and that of my great-grandparents, too, but they crossed the St. Lawrence in the early 20th century). There is a Canadian feminist fitness blogger I read. Her fitness/diet advice is good but her femo-socialist pride in Canada’s system of “free” healthcare and tuition and absolute secularism in every aspect of life is a bit tough to swallow, especially when I think about how stifled people must feel when they see goings-on with which they disagree and cannot comment.

    But it’s happening here, too. I don’t pick on public schools for the no prayer, no crucifixes thing (I have other issues with schooling) because they are, on their face at least, secular institutions and not about promoting a religious ideology (unless that religion is enviro-femi-social-equalism of the Democratic political variety). Oh, the dissonance…But I am saddened by the loss of some of the beautiful music and traditions that were once celebrated openly and embraced by many, secular and religious, as part of the social fabric. Obfuscating the religious roots of these customs, or forcing religious celebration into the underground, is doing the exact opposite of making people comfortable with each other. It’s building an Orwellian brothers-keeper society of spies who will out their neighbors for anti-social activity. Like the raw milk issue a few posts down, no one will be allowed to take part in any activity unless it is government approved, and that frightens me. Because then you DO have state religion (of worship of the secular and unexceptional), which at least in America is verboten.

    (new handle, I was M@dB!ker but had to retire that name. Thanks)

     
  2. Carnivore

    January 13, 2012 at 8:30 am

    And to top it off, eggs aren’t even spheres!

     
  3. Will S.

    January 13, 2012 at 10:05 am

    Exactly! Why, they should call it a ‘springtime festivity deformed ellipsoid’. 😉

     
  4. Will S.

    January 13, 2012 at 10:21 am

    @ The Artist Formerly Known As M@dB!ker: It’s true, many of my fellow Canadians have an inflated opinion of themselves. I’m not in the least offended by others getting tired of the self-righteousness of my people, particularly the ‘progressives’ amongst us; it annoys me, too.

    I don’t mind no teacher-led prayer in public schools (though stopping students from privately doing so, I’d have a problem with), but I do think private schools and daycares, etc., should be allowed to have them. As for the no crucifixes thing, though, I think that’s enforcing secularism upon people in terms of their personal expression; it’s one thing to say, a public school has people of all different faiths or lack thereof; it’s another to say that such requires those who follow a particular faith to be required to hide it; that’s totalitarian, IMO. Same with banning kids from bowing their heads and praying quietly… I object strongly, therefore, to what France has done, and what Quebec is doing, etc. (And as has happened in America, and in the rest of Canada, too, to some extent (though, oddly enough, I think public schools are not quite as hostile here to religion as they seem to be in the States – not in every province, anyway).)

     
  5. Cranberry

    January 13, 2012 at 10:28 am

    Will, I didn’t read the article about France, just the linkie to the article about Quebec (and at first, I thought Springtime festivity spheres was your joke, then I saw it was a serious proposal – facepalm).

    I taught at a public school that had a Christian student club, and I don’t think students are prohibited anywhere from wearing outward signs of their faith like crucifix necklaces or rings. Prayer is permitted outside of the classrooms if done in a respectful, non-showy manner. If it did not interfere with the learning environment and did not seek to proselytize, it was pretty much cool. I don’t wear jewelry that advertises my faith, for various reasons, but would be affronted if someone told me I could not just because I was in public.

    They do this in Turkey – enforced secularism for all. I taught at another school that had a very high population of Turks who came here so their daughters could wear hijab and not be in violation of the law for it. Interesting.

     
  6. Will S.

    January 13, 2012 at 11:22 am

    Glad to hear that individual personal expression isn’t prohibited yet in public schools there.

    In a way, one can sort of understand the attitude of the French (though I disagree with it), because it flows from their history, with their radically secular revolution in 1789. But Quebec had been cut off from France 30 years before that, yet they have adopted the same mindset as their overseas cousins… (I suppose that’s due to the Quiet Revolution; they’ve played ‘catch-up’, and have indeed ‘caught up’, to their motherland, in terms of militant secularization…)

     
  7. Svar

    January 13, 2012 at 1:41 pm

    Secularism is spiritual AIDS.

     
  8. Will S.

    January 13, 2012 at 2:23 pm

    Indeed.

     
  9. samsonsjawbone

    January 14, 2012 at 1:42 pm

    I don’t know why Canadians think they are so awesome and tolerant, when it seems like they are anything but

    Ha, ha… always good when someone sees that our emperor has no clothes.

    though, oddly enough, I think public schools are not quite as hostile here to religion as they seem to be in the States – not in every province, anyway

    Yes, there is a weird effect where in some circumstances Canada is actually more tolerant of conservatism than the US is. I think it has to do with the facts that: 1) the culture wars haven’t been as hot here, so that while conservatives haven’t had as many victories they haven’t had as many outright losses, either; and 2) that liberalism here doesn’t feel as threatened by conservatism, so is able to throw it a bone or two.

     
  10. samsonsjawbone

    January 14, 2012 at 1:48 pm

    Worth mentioning, too, for our friends that don’t know a lot about Canada, is that Quebec is a real-time example that secularism brings its own judgement and death to a society. Decades ago, Quebec used to have a third of Canada’s population. Now it has a quarter. Their mad, family-hostile policies are driving their own increasing political and demographic irrelevance!

    Conservatives sometimes like to predict this for secularists in America, or the West in general, and so it’s worth it to point out a real-life example. This really happens to secular cultures.

     
  11. Will S.

    January 14, 2012 at 5:34 pm

    Yes, there is a weird effect where in some circumstances Canada is actually more tolerant of conservatism than the US is. I think it has to do with the facts that: 1) the culture wars haven’t been as hot here, so that while conservatives haven’t had as many victories they haven’t had as many outright losses, either; and 2) that liberalism here doesn’t feel as threatened by conservatism, so is able to throw it a bone or two.

    Exactly, Samson! Canada is not a country where most people proclaim their political allegiances and causes on bumper stickers; people keep their convictions a little closer to their chests, and don’t fight quite as intense ideological warfare as Stateside. I’m not saying this is either good or bad; it just is, what it is.

    Quebec is a real-time example that secularism brings its own judgement and death to a society. Decades ago, Quebec used to have a third of Canada’s population. Now it has a quarter. Their mad, family-hostile policies are driving their own increasing political and demographic irrelevance!

    Indeed. The Quiet Revolution was precisely the result of the increased clout Quebec had due to its high birthrate hitherto then; they called it “the revenge of the cradles“. But, ironically, just at the moment of gaining influence, they began, with the Quiet Revolution, the rapid, and rabid, secularization, that has resulted in them completely losing control of their destiny; swamped in a sea of allophones (immigrants and their descendents who speak neither English nor French as a first language), the 1995 referendum was lost by the sovereignists truly due to “money and the ethnic vote”, as Premier Jacques Parizeau said (causing much controversy, but he was right). Had the French-Canadian birthrate in Quebec stayed strong, they might have been able to have gained their independence, as a country; now, that cause is completely lost. (Of course, the high level of immigration also being partly responsible for that, carries other lessons for the rest of us, too…)

    Conservatives sometimes like to predict this for secularists in America, or the West in general, and so it’s worth it to point out a real-life example. This really happens to secular cultures.

    Indeed, it does. However, if immigration of people inclined to vote for leftist / liberal parties is kept at a high level (meaning, non-white, non-Asian, Third World minorities, in particular, but also some Europeans, particularly southern ones), then even as native-born progressives may ‘die out’ due to not reproducing enough / being gay, they will recruit more foreign-born immigrants into their political ranks, at least at the ballot box if not into their parties, thus maintaining progressive influence, allowing them to punch above their weight. For example, Quebec went NDP in the last federal election; while the Bloc Quebecois was crushed, the social democratic strain that is ever-present in Quebec political life, has remained intact, even if the sovereignist side has diminished in importance and influence. Quebec will thus stay leftist, at odds with the populist, slightly conservative trend (only slight, not on social conservative issues to any appreciable degree at present) of the rest of Canada in many ways…

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s