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Category Archives: Linklove

Fifteen female-less feature films

They ostensibly bitch about it, but this is a list of (IMO, having seen the majority of them) great movies for men.

 
 

If You’re Complaining About How Little Housework Your Husband Does, You’re Doing Marriage Wrong

If You’re Complaining About How Little Housework Your Husband Does, You’re Doing Marriage Wrong

Hear, hear!

 

Gerry T. Neal and Kevin Michael Grace on Monday’s Canadian federal election

Aftermath Reflections

Great analyses, both. (As I predicted Gerry would, and I knew KMG would, too; scroll up to read the whole thing after clicking on the vdare link in his tweet.)

I share Gerry’s distaste for Western separatism, but I do wonder, like KMG, if it isn’t inevitable, eventually… (Except the cities of the West have enough imports from the East and elsewhere, that the Western provinces may lose control of the ability to opt for such in the same way that Québécois have lost have that ability, defeated in the 1995 separation referendum by ‘money and the ethnic vote’, as Jacques Parizeau bitterly and correctly put it. That process, of the native-born western populace diminishing in proportion to incoming outsiders, especially as young westerners also exodus to Ontario, will only continue with the passing of time…)

 

Vichycons and Mass Shootings

Excellent essay.

I only wish sensible moderates would read it…

 

Scale, and SCALE

A handy acronym and concept:

SCALE goes hand in hand with scale…

https://archive.is/YtlEI

https://web.archive.org/web/20131130203702/https://mpcdot.com/forums/topic/155-the-limits-of-human-scale/

https://www.jameslafond.com/article.php?id=3404

https://vdare.com/posts/2kevins-with-grace-steel-grrrl-power-s-red-guards-the-spectre-of-scale-size-complexity-atomization-liberalization-and-elitism-etc

https://anti-gnostic.blogspot.com/2016/11/scale.html

 

Dissident view on Ross Perot

Here.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on July 11, 2019 in Linklove

 

A couple interesting science links from Prufrock

David Gelernter, the well-known professor of computer science at Yale, grew up believing Darwin’s theory of the origin of life. Well, he doesn’t believe it any more: “There’s no reason to doubt that Darwin successfully explained the small adjustments by which an organism adapts to local circumstances: changes to fur density or wing style or beak shape. Yet there are many reasons to doubt whether he can answer the hard questions and explain the big picture—not the fine-tuning of existing species but the emergence of new ones. The origin of species is exactly what Darwin cannot explain.” 

[…]

It is not uncommon for scientists to believe that there is intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. After all, if “the ingredients for life are everywhere, and there are astronomically large numbers of stars and planets where it’s possible for life to have arisen, then we’d expect many instances in which intelligent aliens rose to prominence well before the advent of human life on Earth.” But maybe that’s all wrong. Maybe life is extremely rare, Ethan Siegel writes, and maybe it doesn’t exist anywhere else in the complexity that it exists on Earth:

“While we certainly owe it to ourselves to look for their presence with all the resources we can muster, we must confront the possibility that perhaps we’ve got it all wrong about just how common life in the universe is. Perhaps the ingredients and conditions on Earth don’t inevitably lead to life arising on a potentially habitable world beyond our planet. And even if life does arise elsewhere, it may be the case that it frequently fails to thrive. Maybe it’s the case that even successful life only rarely becomes complex, differentiated, or intelligent as we understand those terms. Or, quite possibly, it’s exceedingly rare that even intelligent life becomes technologically advanced. In all of space, as far as intelligent life goes, perhaps humanity is truly alone.”

Read the rest.

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9 Comments

Posted by on May 16, 2019 in "science", Linklove