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How to tell if a neighbourhood is ‘vibrant’, ‘diverse’

11 May

Great quote:

This is an observant comment by theng85, about the costs, big and small, that Diversity™ imposes on society.

Also, a shower thought regarding vibrancy and open borders:

You’ve mentioned before that when a country’s border in weak or unstable, more mini-barriers will be opened up within the confines of the border. I’ll never forget walking by a brownstone in Brooklyn that had a “No border wall” sign in the window….A window that had bars over it and a locking gate around the property. What’s good for the goose isn’t good for the gander, I guess.

But there are more boundaries where there’s more vibrancy. My litmus test for whether or not I’m in a bad area is how easily I can access things in something like a gas station or a McDonald’s. If there’s a table with napkins, straws, ketchup, sugar packets, and I can walk into the bathroom and do my business without needing to talk to the staff, then I’m in a good (Read: White) area.

But if the ketchup and napkins are behind the counter, or you need to be buzzed into the bathroom/given a key, or you have to talk to the cashier through a 6 inch sheet of bulletproof glass, then you’re in a bad (Read: Vibrant) area. One of the selling points of my current apartment was that the 24-hour gas station down the street had open access to its bathrooms 24/7. That means I was in a safe neighborhood with little to no vibrancy. And I was right!

tl;dr: Diversity causes instability, instability creates boundaries.

Yep. I’ve noticed the same thing…

Another: does a neighbourhood / school dance require you to go through airport-style security?

When I went back to post-graduate school a few years back in Toronto, one night, I decided to attend a school dance; when I went, I shit you not, there was an X-ray machine that they made me pass the contents of my pockets through, and there was a portal I had to pass through, and an electromagnetic, beeping wand was waved around my body after, to make sure I hadn’t anything metallic still in my pockets. Just like at an airport.

At a college dance.

In Canada.

That never used to happen in the Great White North.

But now it does.

I found out why: 99% of the attendees were either homeboys / homegirls, guidos, or other wiggers, all droopy-pants-barely-wearing, ‘sup, ‘sup, yo’, hand-gesturing excessively types…

And it was all ‘urban’, hip-hop / R&B music…

Needless to say, I didn’t stick around very long that evening; I had maybe two beers, then I left…

Anyway, theng85’s comment at Roissy is helpful if you’re investigating a place, considering moving there…  (I also had a real estate agent describe a building elsewhere in the GTA to me as probably being ‘too Jane-and-Finch-y’ for my tastes, and anyone who’s ever spent any time in Toronto will know exactly what that means…)

Be careful not to step in the ‘diversity’…

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8 responses to “How to tell if a neighbourhood is ‘vibrant’, ‘diverse’

  1. Saracen III

    May 11, 2017 at 5:10 pm

    I always thought that being legally required to lock one’s car was starting at the wrong end of of the problem.

     
    • Will S.

      May 11, 2017 at 9:28 pm

      Indeed.

      But an understandable precaution, once the neighbourhood has changed thus…

       
  2. Cecil Henry

    May 11, 2017 at 9:49 pm

    I can always tell when its a diverse area because I don’t want to be there. And neither does anyone else. YOu can see it on their faces.

    Very telling.

    It’s important to say nice things about diversity or reporters will get you fired and you won’t be able to afford living away from diversity

     
  3. feeriker

    May 11, 2017 at 11:29 pm

    It helps to move to areas that have always been historically “vibrant free,” or where they’re such a tiny percentage of the population that they begave themselves, knowing that “going zoological” will have consequences. (How many “chimpouts” take place in Salt Lake City? Exactly …)

     

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