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More reasons to disagree with chaplaincies

07 May

From here:

Peter Berger notices a sector of American religiosity where true inclusion and diversity reigns — the military chaplaincy:

One particularly interesting development is that the military chaplaincy, in its Protestant group, is increasingly filled with Evangelicals, who feel more at home in the military than among largely liberal mainline clergy, whose concerns over gender and multiculturalism Evangelicals don’t resonate with. Some years ago I presided over a seminar dealing with whatever issues members of the seminar were concerned about. One of the seminar students was an Evangelical Air Force chaplain. This was the issue she wanted to think through: She served on a small base in the Arctic where she was the only Protestant chaplain. Of course she was not expected to perform religious services that did not agree with her own beliefs. But she was expected to facilitate services for any group of Air Force personnel. A group of Air Force women wanted to perform the rituals of Wicca, which defines itself as a modernized version of the old witches’ Sabbath. How, she asked, could she help organize a worship service of the devil without betraying the core of her Christian faith? I tried to convince her that the devil part was not to be taken seriously, that Wicca was a rather harmless form of nature worship—dancing naked in the moonlight and showing respect for menstrual blood. She said that the way I spoke about this showed I did not take the religious beliefs of this group seriously. I’m afraid she was quite right. In the end she had no choice unless she wanted to resign from the chaplaincy—so the would-be witches did their thing as facilitated by a nonsectarian Evangelical minister. (Religious freedom bears strange fruit, including the struggle of conscience of an Evangelical pastor ordered to go against her conscience by her commanding officer.)

Just more of the crap that happens with chaplaincies in the U.S. military these days (see previous examples here, here, here, and here), which, along with the aspect of in effect blessing the State’s wars, have made me wonder why churches bother sending chaplains to the military. (I’ve also wondered why should the State bother having chaplaincies, but I get why they do; to invoke God’s blessing upon their enterprise, though whether to use such to garner support for imperialism or to convince themselves they’re doing right, I don’t know nor care.)

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10 responses to “More reasons to disagree with chaplaincies

  1. feeriker

    May 7, 2017 at 2:19 am

    One of the seminar students was an Evangelical Air Force chaplain. This was the issue she wanted to …

    WHOA! Stop right there…

     
    • Will S.

      May 7, 2017 at 8:35 am

      Exactly.

      Recently, Rod Dreher featured a link to an essay by an Anglican priestess bitching about unaccountable heretical evangelical bloggers like Jen Hatmaker. People said, “Uh; first problem, she’s not in a position to be throwing stones…” I said, “Pot, meet kettle”, or tried to; he has blocked me.

       
      • feeriker

        May 7, 2017 at 9:47 am

        I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the U.S. military soon issues an edict stating that any denomination that does not ordain women will not have itself represented in the chaplain corps. And of course, as obsessed with Caesar’s blessing as ALL churchian denominations are, they will ALL scramble to comply, the message of the Scriptures prohibiting such practices be damned.

         
  2. Brian K

    May 7, 2017 at 11:35 am

    A few thoughts. She is correct about Wicca. The founder of Wicca, Gerald Gardner, was a disciple of notorious satanist Aleister Crowley, and was initiated into the occult secret society Ordo Templi Orientis by Crowley himself. Second, hasn’t she read I Timothy 2:12? ” And I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man, but to be in silence.” She is in rebellion against the God she seeks to serve. She should repent.

     
    • feeriker

      May 7, 2017 at 4:44 pm

      Second, hasn’t she read I Timothy 2:12? ” And I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man, but to be in silence.” She is in rebellion against the God she seeks to serve. She should repent.

      If she were an actual Christian, she would. However, the fact that she’s doing something so overtly in contempt of Scripture demonstrates that she’s not. So no, she won’t repent, because in her mind she’s committed no sin. In fact, she probably doesn’t even believe in “sin” or “repentance,” except within the context of some transgression committed against Moloch, who is her REAL object of worship.

       
    • Will S.

      May 7, 2017 at 5:03 pm

      Yep.

       
  3. Sean

    May 7, 2017 at 1:39 pm

    The Canadian chaplaincy isn’t any better: last time I looked, the head was openly homosexual in addition to theologically troubled.

     
    • Will S.

      May 7, 2017 at 5:04 pm

      Oh, I know. And the same sort of push to promote Wiccanism, etc. is present in our military, as well.

       

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