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Why Christians Shouldn’t See Christian Movies

17 Apr
Why Christians Shouldn’t See Christian Movies

Old Life

Here’s one reason:

The glaring problem with God’s Not Dead, and most other films made for and marketed at the “faith audience,” is that instead of exercising and challenging the imagination of their audience in ways that would make their audience better Christians, they shut down imagination and whisper sweet nothings into their ears instead.

God’s Not Dead enlists an army of straw men (the evil atheist professor who will fail a student for refusing to sign a paper agreeing that God is dead, the evil atheist boyfriend who abandons his girlfriend as soon as she announces her terminal illness, the evil Muslim father who kicks his daughter out of the home for converting, the evil liberal ambush journalist with a bumper sticker on her car that reads “I love evolution”) then burns them in effigy. The movie isn’t content to merely convert our main antagonist, effectively forcing him…

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16 Comments

Posted by on April 17, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

16 responses to “Why Christians Shouldn’t See Christian Movies

  1. Cecil Henry

    April 17, 2016 at 12:45 pm

    There’s also the aspect that so much mainstream Christian is just cover for PC social justice Marxism sugar coated with Jesus ‘niceness’.

    Its destructive, anti-white, envious, coercive, nihilistic, civilization destroying status seeking.

    (Rant over)

     
  2. Sean

    April 17, 2016 at 3:01 pm

    If you’re watching it, it’s for you.

    We’re a market, nothing else. A ticket buying, movie going (albeit less so), market.

     
  3. Eric

    April 17, 2016 at 5:18 pm

    The problem is that when Hollywood made movies like Ben-Hur (1925); many people in the industry actually were Christians or came from Christian backgrounds (or at least lived in predominantly Christian culture). It’s amazing watching films and even TV programs —up until about the 1970s—that at least presumed the audience was Christian or had Christian values.

    Today, Hollywood are bunch of degenerates (like the rest of American society) and whether attacking or marketing to Christians they can’t think outside of Christian stereotypes. And unfortunately, most American Christians usually don’t give them reason to think otherwise.

     
  4. feeriker

    April 18, 2016 at 1:28 am

    Today, Hollywood are bunch of degenerates (like the rest of American society) and whether attacking or marketing to Christians they can’t think outside of Christian stereotypes. And unfortunately, most American Christians usually don’t give them reason to think otherwise.

    Yup. As far as Hollywood is concerned, American Christians are naive, intellectually stunted, benighted bumpkins whose entertainment needs to be kept simple and grounded in shallow stereotypes.

    Quite honestly, based on my own daily and weekly experiences with my fellow Christians, I too cannot see where they’re in any way off the mark in their assessment. Evangelical Protestants in particular seem to possess an almost willful ignorance of the world in which they live, as if confronting and understanding it is some spiritually threatening and cerebrally destructive endeavor on par with a field trip into hell. This explains also their abysmal ignorance of people and how they think, as well as how thinking non-believers perceive Christianity as they see it practiced by said Christians (this, coupled with the evangelical church’s criminal neglect of apologetics [do they not know what “evangelize” means, for heaven’s sake?], ensures epic failure in the outreach and church growth realm).

    So yes, Hollywood knows its audience, whether or not some of us want to admit that unpleasant truth. It’s what they pay experts for – to know their audience so they can maximize profits by “giving the public what it wants.”

    TL;DR version: “Christian” movies target the spiritually-deep-as-a-rain-puddle-and-mature-as-a-baby churchian who can’t distinguish the contents of the Bible from the contents of a pulp novel. These are, after all, the majority of today’s “Christians,” as just 15 minutes in any North American church on Sunday morning will instantly confirm.

     
  5. Deep Thought

    April 19, 2016 at 10:42 am

    Why shouldn’t Christians have feel good movies? Does it always have to be negative?

     
    • Will S.

      April 19, 2016 at 11:29 am

      Why indeed? Problem is when said movies are stupid and clichéd; bad art.

      Then it reflects poorly on us, and contributes to stereotypes.

       
  6. infowarrior1

    April 20, 2016 at 12:01 am

    Entertainment for Christians largely today is an insult to intelligence.

     
    • Will S.

      April 20, 2016 at 2:33 am

      Indeed.

       
      • infowarrior1

        April 20, 2016 at 9:07 pm

        I watched an old Christian Movie called Quo Vadis. And it appears the feminism in “Christian” Movies even existed back then.

        The “Christian” Woman in the Movie acts like a total shrew and embodies none of the quiet and gentle spirit of what a Christian woman behaves like.

        So one should wary of the Christian Movies that Hollywood produces even the good quality ones.

         
      • Will S.

        April 21, 2016 at 1:38 am

        Yes, and Quo Vadis? also has some homo humour in it, too; Nero’s effeminate nature is played for kicks, which may seem like it’s poking fun at it, but that kind of humour helped normalize such behaviour, in the minds of many; it led to where we are now, where such is outright celebrated.

        So yes, one must be wary of both Hollywood ‘Christian’ movies and evanjellyfish ‘Christian’ (Churchian) movies; they can both be subversive, in bad ways.

         

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