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Nota bene

14 May

tuna

milk

butter

Hot_Liquids_Burn_Like_Fire

fire

moisttowelette

toothpicks

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32 responses to “Nota bene

  1. realgaryseven

    May 15, 2015 at 12:55 am

    Reblogged this on ReactionaryThought.

     
  2. Carnivore

    May 15, 2015 at 7:02 am

    Regarding tuna – fish and butter – milk, just goes to show how far some people have come from preparing food from raw or natural ingredients. For some fun, ask what raw fruits are used to make raisins and prunes. The real stumper is to ask what makes Jello gel up the way it does.

     
  3. feeriker

    May 15, 2015 at 12:32 pm

    Um, a practical question:

    Asssuming that people are so stupid as to require written instructions for how to use the simplest and most obvious of items, why does anyone assume that they’re smart enough to be able to READ OR COMPREHEND such instructions?

     
  4. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 6:11 pm

    @ Carnivore: Indeed. It’s fun to observe people learning the main source of commercial gelatin – horse’s hooves. 🙂

    @ feeriker: A damned good point. 🙂

     
  5. Eric

    May 15, 2015 at 6:35 pm

    Not long ago, the local Laundromat got some new washers and dryers and I noticed there were warning labels on the machines stating they were to be used on for clothes and not for bathing purposes. I asked the manager if this was a joke and shook his head and said the warnings came with the machines.

    Then he mentioned he’d recently bought a bicycle kit and the instructions contained a warning not to operate it without tires.

     
  6. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 6:36 pm

    Yep.

    That’s our world, today…

     
  7. Eric

    May 15, 2015 at 6:37 pm

    Another one: I’m looking at a jar of peanut butter that has an allergy warning that ‘this product contains peanuts.’

     
  8. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 6:39 pm

    Yes, I heard about such warnings on peanut butter. Like someone with a severe peanut allergy wouldn’t already know that.

    Insanity…

     
  9. Carnivore

    May 15, 2015 at 6:48 pm

    A combination of stupid people and shyster lawyers winning lawsuits for stupid people.

     
  10. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 6:48 pm

    That must be it…

     
  11. Eric

    May 15, 2015 at 6:51 pm

    Add imbecile judges and corrupt bureaucrats into the mix…

     
  12. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 6:54 pm

    BTW, my American friends, I used to wonder why y’all said ‘tunafish’ instead of just ‘tuna’ (“I’ll have a tunafish on rye sandwich, please”), which for some reason we Canucks don’t do, but now I get it: if you leave off that ‘fish’ modifier, someone might think you meant some other kind of tuna that isn’t fish:

    https://willsrandomweirdness.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/why-its-right-for-yanks-to-say-tunafish/

    😉

     
  13. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 6:54 pm

    @ Eric: Indeed.

     
  14. Eric

    May 15, 2015 at 7:10 pm

    In Mexico, ‘tuna’ is the fruit of the Nopale Cactus, so you won’t get fish if you ask for it there, either. Actually, the cactus fruit is pretty good, but they don’t export it here for some reason.

    The fish is ‘Atun’ south of the border.

     
  15. Will S.

    May 15, 2015 at 7:13 pm

    Ah! I had no idea. Interesting!

    I’ve never eaten cactus fruit, but I have had candy made from the prickly pear cactus’ fruit. It was interesting.

    ‘Atun’, a literal anagram of our term. Also interesting!

    Thanks Eric!

     
  16. Eric

    May 15, 2015 at 10:30 pm

    Ah—I’d forgotten about Cactus Candy. The prickly-pear and nopale are the same thing. In Mexico, they also cook and the cactus—it tastes like green beans,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opuntia

     
    • Will S.

      May 15, 2015 at 10:48 pm

      Oh yeah, I think I may have known that, but had forgotten; I learned a lot about cacti a few years back when I visited the Desert Botanical Gardens in Phoenix, Arizona, but I’ve probably forgotten a lot of it (after all, no cacti up here except indoors; but I saw some in a conservatory this past winter, which included varieties not only from the U.S. SW, but also ones from Chile and other desert regions.). 🙂

       
  17. feeriker

    May 16, 2015 at 12:01 am

    A combination of stupid people and shyster lawyers winning lawsuits for stupid people.

    The biggest fear that the ABA has is that the American majority will grow –and start using– functioning cerebra. That would put personal injury attorneys out of business.

     
  18. Will S.

    May 16, 2015 at 8:23 am

    Alas, no chance of that happening, anytime soon…

     
  19. Lena S.

    May 16, 2015 at 9:29 am

    Feeriker said what I’ve been saying for years about those warnings, lol. I recently bought some peanut butter thinking it was the only peanuts kind because it said “Contains: Peanuts”, but of course, that wasn’t the ingredients list. Annoying! Need to develop a habit of taking my glasses to the store.

    On the “tunafish” thing, Americans also have a brand “Chicken of the Sea”, so I guess there are people who think tuna is chicken. ::facepalm::

    Then there’s “beets” versus “beetroot”. I normally use the latter, being English and all, but no one says “carrotroot”, so in this instance, perhaps the Americans make more sense.

     
  20. Will S.

    May 16, 2015 at 10:58 am

    Ah, it was a peanut warning, not an ingredient list, lol.

    I suppose, from the label above, that some might think tuna steak is steak. 🙂

    I’ve always been mystified by that ‘beetroot’ name, too, so I’m with the Yanks and not the Brits in that. 🙂

     
  21. feeriker

    May 16, 2015 at 10:53 pm

    On the “tunafish” thing, Americans also have a brand “Chicken of the Sea”, so I guess there are people who think tuna is chicken. ::facepalm::

    I’m not about to risk losing the last tiny fragment of faith I have left in humanity by actually testing it, but I would wager that it would be agonizingly easy to fake zoological evidence of “marine fowl” and claim that this is what CoTS uses in its product.

    As for the term “tuna,” that is indeed the Spanish word for, and botanical name for, the fruit of the prickly pear cactus. Here in southern Arizona it grows wild and ripens to a deep juicy purple by late August/early September, ready for picking and perfect for boiling into juice for jellies, candy, or, in my own case, a nice flavoring for homemade mead. What amazes me is how few people choose to do anything with it.

     
    • Will S.

      May 16, 2015 at 11:04 pm

      You make your own mead, feeriker? Awesome! The only mead I’ve ever had is the Scottish one Moniack, which is too sweet for my tastes. Someday, I hope to try some drier, less sweet meads.

      I do like the idea of flavouring mead with prickly pear; that must be great!

       
  22. feeriker

    May 17, 2015 at 12:22 am

    Will:

    The first batch I made four years ago is one you probably would like*, as it turned out much drier than I anticipated it would (next time I need to add an extra four or five pounds of honey to the primary fermentation stage). This was just straight honey mead, but I made a small (2 gallon) batch adding prickly pear juice as an experimental batch, just to see if it would turn out. It did – big time. My next batch will be a full six-gallon batch of prickly pear-honey mead.

    Alas, it takes a full year for a batch to mature …

    (* I still have five bottles left out of that batch. Heck, I’d send you one if I could figure out how to ship it to Canada without it breaking. LOLZ)

     
  23. Will S.

    May 17, 2015 at 12:33 am

    Thanks for the offer, but it’d be more trouble than it’s worth, what with duty to be paid on alcohol, and possibly restrictions on mailing liquids, not sure (we have lots more rules here). 🙂

    I have read that there are some drier commercial meads out there, I intend to try some at some point.

    It’s not that I don’t like the sweet stuff at all; I like it in small doses, like liqueurs or sweet wines. But I’d prefer to quaff drier stuff if I wanted to have a full-sized unit drink (i.e. the alcohol that is in 1.5 oz spirits, which = that in 12 oz beer, which = that in 5 oz wine).

     
  24. ray

    May 17, 2015 at 11:52 pm

    As a teenager my buddy worked on cars. In his driveway and ours. My job was handing him tools and changing channels on the transistor.

    Doing a brake job one day he was on the other side of his layback rambler, and asked me to re-attach one tire while he did the other. So I put the rim and tire back on.

    He got in and tried the brakes but still no luck. When he got around to my side he saw that I hadn’t put the wheel on FIRST.

    He didn’t ask me to fix anything else after that. :O)

    So if it’s not too late for the OP, I would like to be considered ‘in the running’. Cheers.

     

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