RSS

Socialist party wins majority in Canada’s most conservative province

06 May

The Wildrose were NOT all that much more conservative than the Tories; yes, they had some members who were, but their leader (till recently) was not; see my commentary from the last AB election, here.

Albertans are not so much conservative or progressive, as they are populist, and in favour of long-term political dynasties of whatever persuasion they feel like choosing once in a while; see my chart there, for a run-down of their entire electoral history.

I fully expect the NDP to remain in power for the next several elections, given Albertans’ political history. The ‘right’ will remain divided for some time to come, and the NDP will keep winning, until Albertans are sick of them.

Eventually, the myth that Alberta is really that much more conservative than any other Canadian province will die, as it deserves to.

WINTERY KNIGHT

Orange = NDP, Green = Wildrose, Blue = Conservative Orange = NDP, Green = Wildrose, Blue = Conservative

This article from Reuters explains what happened.

It says:

The left-wing New Democrats won election in the Canadian province of Alberta on Tuesday, ending the 44-year run by the Progressive Conservatives amid promises to review oversight of the oil and gas sector in the home of Canada’s oil sands.

At the end of a month-long campaign, the New Democratic Party (NDP), which has never held more than 16 seats in the 87-seat provincial legislature, will lead a majority government. It held a commanding lead in early results, leading or elected in 54 seats at 9 p.m. local time while the Conservatives were ahead in just 13, according to CBC TV.

The NDP is expected to be far less accommodative to the Western Canadian province’s powerful energy industry.

NDP Premier-elect Rachel Notley has proposed reduced support for pipeline export projects and a…

View original post 415 more words

Advertisements
 
 

15 responses to “Socialist party wins majority in Canada’s most conservative province

  1. The Man Who Was . . .

    May 6, 2015 at 6:14 pm

    Nah. (More or less) conservative parties still had over 50% of the vote. There was a confluence of special circumstances: recession, united left, charismatic leader, very tired regime. The left wing has absolutely maxed out its support and has nowhere to go but down. The NDP only has to fall a few percentage points to find themselves radically reduced in seat numbers.

     
  2. Will S.

    May 6, 2015 at 6:34 pm

    We’ll see, in time, if this was just an anomaly, like Ontario going NDP in 1990, or if they can hold on.

    And we’ll also see if the fracture of the right can and will be healed anytime soon.

     
  3. Gerry T. Neal

    May 6, 2015 at 8:51 pm

    Kevin Michael Grace predicted this outcome at The Ambler. I will be commenting on it in an essay that will hopefully be out this weekend. From my perspective, Alberta is the least conservative province and has been for the duration of the time it has claimed to be the most conservative. To be a conservative in Canada you must be a royalist. It is non-negotiable. In Alberta, more than any other province, you will find self-identifying “conservatives” who are republicans. They also have plenty of “fiscal conservatives” who despise social conservatism. The NDP is the most anti-Canadian party when it comes to the traditions and institutions of old Canada (the 1867 Dominion), beating out even the Liberals. It has made abolition of the Senate a plank of their party platform, a plank that many supposed “conservatives” in Alberta would agree with. This result comes as no surprise to me. Capitalists are always the first to turn socialist in economic downtimes.

     
  4. Will S.

    May 6, 2015 at 8:59 pm

    Ah! I haven’t checked on his site in a while.

    I agree; Alberta may at times be ‘neo-conservative’, but that’s not the same thing; they do not value tradition, and indeed, many are not only republicans rather than monarchists, but also annexationists; I met several when I lived there. That is not conservative, for any Canadian.

    And agree re: the NDP.

    Looking forward to your post, Gerry!

     
  5. ray

    May 7, 2015 at 2:14 am

    What are ‘Progressive Conservatives’? Are they the obverse of ‘Conservative Progressives’?

    Guess you flip the coin and hope it lands on edge. :O)

    Cheers.

     
  6. Mark Citadel

    May 7, 2015 at 8:37 am

    “ending the 44-year run by the Progressive Conservatives”

    Well, at least they achnowledge what they are. Maybe this will cause more people to realize that every political party is essentially leftist. The choice is leftism today or leftism tomorrow?

     
  7. electricangel

    May 7, 2015 at 9:47 am

    Raping the Northwoods for a few bucks is hardly Conservative. Believing that God placed the earth in Man’s hand to husband and nurture is. When you get an economic collapse like the one caused by the oil price collapse, people start to wonder about all the funny money they got in return for their patrimony. Voting in NDP is like crying rape after the hunky millionaire boyfriend turned out to just be looking for new fields to exploit.

     
  8. feeriker

    May 7, 2015 at 12:50 pm

    Presumptuous as it might be for me to say it (not being Canadian), I can’t imagine that there is any more significant and substantive difference between Canadian political parties than there is between those here south of the border. It seems to me that the universal truth about electoral politics is that it all ultimately comes down to which collar of a particular corrupt and violent oligarch feels most comfortable around your throat.

    I think kicking the political habit has conferred an even better long-term health benefit on me than kicking the nicotine habit.

     
  9. Will S.

    May 7, 2015 at 4:11 pm

    @ ray: 🙂 One wag used to call them the ‘Regressive Convertibles’, which I liked.

    The federal Conservative Party of Canada was, from 1942-2003, called the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, when the leader of the Manitoba Progressive Party became leader of the federal Conservatives on the condition they add the word ‘Progressive’ to their name. Various provincial parties sprang up with that combined name, and many still carry it, even though the federal party has jettisoned it.

    Alas, both the federal Conservatives, and the various provincial Progressive Conservatives, are Conservative In Name Only, tending to combine neo-conservatism on business and foreign policy matters with socially ‘moderate’ or even liberal policies, though tending more to stay out of active debates, simply not opposing our court system pushing the country further to the left; they actively avoid discussion of abortion, gay rights, etc.

    And since neo-conservatives are not traditionalist in any real sense, they’re hardly conservative at all; just pro-big-business.

    I hate them. I will not vote for them. Or anyone else up here, at present, either, though I will vote Libertarian in protest if one runs in my riding, when an election is on.

    @ Mark: Yes, I guess, to their credit, they’ve long acknowledged that they left full-on conservatism behind from WWII onwards… Too bad the federal party, which in merging with the more rightist, populist Canadian Alliance dropped the word ‘Progressive’ in 2003, and which didn’t keep anything of the other party’s character after the merger, manages to fool some idiots into thinking they’re actually any different from the Liberals…

    @ EA: Exactly. There have been dissidents on the right who, a la Wendell Berry, have espoused a conservative conservationism, like the late Wiebo Ludwig, of whom I have written. Conservationism is conservative, or even reactionary; people need to learn this.

    @ feeriker: There’s little difference between the Conservatives and the Liberals; as the leader of the rightist / populist protest party in the 90s, the Reform Party, used to say, “Liberal, Tory (i.e. Conservative), same old story…”

    Alas, the NDP are different; they’re more principled socialists.

    If the Grits (Liberals) and Tories (Conservatives) are like the Dems and the GOP, the NDP are like the Howard Dean, harder left Dems, perhaps combined with the SJWs, and the Occupy Wall Street shitheads, etc. Actual leftists, rather than just liberals.

    But nevertheless, your larger point certainly applies as much up here as down there; the permitted range of political variation is quite narrow, and yes, IMO, it’s all bullshit, and a waste of time. I won’t vote for any of the bastards, and I encourage others to consider not giving the corrupt system your endorsement. Don’t vote; it’s what they want and need. Don’t vote unless and until you get real choices; e.g. someone who will vote to end no-fault divorce, automatic custody of the children going to the mother, etc. Someone who stands for Red Pill views. Otherwise, why bother?

     
  10. ray

    May 8, 2015 at 2:00 am

    Synopsis helped thx. It’s hard for me to keep up with all these politically fractured nations.

    Cheers.

     
  11. Will S.

    May 8, 2015 at 6:03 am

    🙂

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s