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Washington Post: Expert Says Countries ‘feel betrayed’ by Fickle U.S. under Obama

16 Sep

Enjoyment and Contemplation

KaboomWe were told that cowboy Bush had made the world hate America, but that a President Obama would make the world like us and trust us again.

Now even the liberal Washington Post is all but admitting what Mark Steyn and other conservatives have been saying for some time:  The Obama administration has made a habit of failing our allies and helping our enemies, and the world is taking notice.  Under the headline “Obama seeks Arab allies against Islamic State but must overcome mistrust of U.S.”:

But already there is a disinclination to believe his promises, said Mustafa Alani of the Gulf Research Center in Dubai.

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11 Comments

Posted by on September 16, 2014 in America, Brave New World Order, government

 

11 responses to “Washington Post: Expert Says Countries ‘feel betrayed’ by Fickle U.S. under Obama

  1. sfcton

    September 16, 2014 at 12:38 am

    LOL and these fools probably though obama was a good deal for them as he was very popular overseas during his 1st election

     
  2. Will S.

    September 16, 2014 at 12:41 am

    Indeed. 🙂

     
  3. Eric

    September 17, 2014 at 12:19 am

    Will:
    There is an interesting theory going around, totally being ignored the Western media. The Western pundits talk about the ‘New Cold War.’ But Putin’s not stupid: Russia LOST the Cold War. Why would he follow the strategy that ended in defeat the last time?

    Putin may very well consider the US/NATO belligerent powers already. The probing raids; the military alliances Russia’s building: these are the actions of powerful country that’s NOT digging for a protracted arms-race. They may well be already on the offensive, and our leaders are too full of their own hubris to see the threat.

    What do you think?

     
  4. Will S.

    September 17, 2014 at 2:10 am

    Hey Eric, I’m not sure what to think. I do agree with any assessment of NATO as now being belligerent rather than defensive, as per its original charter; NATO has certainly moved far beyond that, now.

    And yeah, I don’t think Putin’s a fool, in the least; but what exactly his endgame is in the Ukraine, I don’t know; perhaps it’s wanting to see the two regions next to Russia break away and become independent, yet unrecognized, states, to act as buffers against the Ukraine and the West – that seems plausible enough, and much in line with previous Russian ways of thinking.

    As for the contention of a ‘New Cold War’, that’s just neo-con BS agit-prop. Putin is no communist, whatever else he may be, much as the brain-dead neo-cons wish he was, so we could have their fantasy of a return to U.S. vs. Soviets, like back in the ’80s. They’re delusional idiots.

     
  5. Eric

    September 17, 2014 at 2:36 am

    My feeling is that Putin may be thinking beyond Ukraine. After the West stirred up problems in Chechnya; undermined Russian allies like Yugoslavia and Libya; tried to get a foothold in Georgia and Ukraine—Putin may have already decided on a more long-range plan to take the US/NATO out altogether where they won’t be a problem anymore.

    And Obama messing around in Syria again is only going to throw gasoline on the fire, because Putin’s already warned him to stay out.

    What I’m getting at here is that Western pundits assume that Russia (and China) want to settle back into the old ‘Balance of Power’ paradigm—that worked for the West last time. Russia and China know it didn’t work for them—and nobody’s thinking that they may decide to change the paradigm and play for keeps this time. Given the weakened condition of the West, that’s a much more viable option than it was in the 1960s.

     
    • Will S.

      September 17, 2014 at 2:40 am

      Interesting supposition. How do you envision it unfolding? Do you think Russia and China just want to break the Western alliance? I can’t imagine either having any possible goals beyond that.

       
  6. Eric

    September 17, 2014 at 9:04 pm

    Will:
    I think that breaking the alliance is their top priority. Already the EU/NATO nations are fed up with NSA spy scandals, US cultural imperialism, and constantly being dragged into wars they didn’t start. When the economic sanctions bite, Putin can turn up the heat by getting the BRIC to impose even more retaliatory sanctions.

    There will probably be some military involvement; such as already happened in Ukraine and Georgia. If Russia deploys troops to bolster Assad in Syria and China continues pressing territorial claims with the US unable to stop them, it will break even the pretense of American ability to continue as ‘the world policeman’.

    Containment is probably their short-term goal; although I’m certain they haven’t ruled out direct confrontation (a la WW3) as a contingency plan or a long-range goal.

     
  7. Will S.

    September 17, 2014 at 9:19 pm

    I would love to see NATO broken up, myself. It has long outlasted its purpose.

    Go, Putin, go! 🙂

     
  8. Eric

    September 19, 2014 at 9:25 pm

    Will:
    I just saw on the news today that the RCAF (again) turned Russian military planes from their airspace. This is another example of ‘breaking the alliance’. How long do you think Ottawa is going to want to stay part of NATO as soon as Canadians start realizing that, in the event of WW3, Canada is going to be a battlefield in a conflict they didn’t start.

     
  9. Will S.

    September 19, 2014 at 9:34 pm

    I hope you’re right, Eric; I’d love to see us pull out of NATO.

    NATO has long outlived its usefulness.

     

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