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Some Bible verses for your day

24 Jul

Isaiah 36:12

Ezekiel 23:20

Why don’t we ever read these verses in church?

Psalm 137:9

Why don’t we ever sing this in worship?

Just askin’.

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21 Comments

Posted by on July 24, 2014 in religion, spirituality, Theology

 

21 responses to “Some Bible verses for your day

  1. feeriker

    July 24, 2014 at 11:54 pm

    My rhetorical answer to your rhetorical questions: anything that offends the feminine imperative is, in the eyes of any church, worse than devil worship or raw blasphemy.

     
  2. Will S.

    July 24, 2014 at 11:58 pm

    Indeed.

     
  3. infowarrior1

    July 25, 2014 at 3:23 am

    With the psalm. When people sing this it appears to be advocating murder of infants.

     
  4. sfcton

    July 25, 2014 at 7:17 am

    The Old Testament teaches you how to be a man and deal with out groups
    The New Testament teaches you how to interact with your in group

    Women treat their in group as out groups, and out groups as in groups. Which is why they go batshit crazy on people they know and not strangers or their boss. The West is dying because we no longer have an us vs them mindset

    The church is dying because effeminate little fags go from their mommy’s apron strings, to seminary school to working in a church without their balls ever dropping instead of being mature men, full of years, with grown kids and a proven track record other men can verify.

     
  5. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 8:46 am

    @ infowarrior1: It did, though, in the Old Testament context.

    @ sfcton:

    “The Old Testament teaches you how to be a man and deal with out groups
    The New Testament teaches you how to interact with your in group”

    Though the New Testament expanded God’s covenant to include not just members of national Israel, but all who will embrace Christ in New Testament times – but only those who do so.

    “Women treat their in group as out groups, and out groups as in groups. Which is why they go batshit crazy on people they know and not strangers or their boss. The West is dying because we no longer have an us vs them mindset

    The church is dying because effeminate little fags go from their mommy’s apron strings, to seminary school to working in a church without their balls ever dropping instead of being mature men, full of years, with grown kids and a proven track record other men can verify.”

    Indeed.

     
  6. sfcton

    July 25, 2014 at 8:50 am

    Even then Will He assigned us to different nations

     
  7. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 9:03 am

    Indeed, He did.

     
  8. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 9:04 am

    Which means as Christians, we belong to two different groups: our nation / ethnos, and our religious tribe, as the Chosen.

     
  9. sfcton

    July 25, 2014 at 9:29 am

    But what it really men as is we are under no obligation to flood our nation’s with foreign born Christains (if those outside of Europe can be Christain at all)

     
  10. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 9:52 am

    Absolutely! They can live in their countries, and we in ours.

    The first Christians were not from Europe, and the Church was given the Great Commission to preach the Gospel to all nations – and has done so. So yes, Christians of non-European backgrounds exist. Even Kinists acknowledge that…

     
  11. sfcton

    July 25, 2014 at 3:06 pm

    Yea but have you ever dealt with said Christians? Everyone I have has had a blend faith system with their old pagan ways married up to their Christain ways. Much like voodoo I reckon. A Catholic Chaplain I had told me Mexicans etc are crap Catholic/ Christains and also very tied into various pagan folk ways. Again much like voodoo

     
  12. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 3:26 pm

    I’ve met Third World Christians, yes; they’re not all alike, either.

    In Catholic Third World countries the sort of thing you describe frequently happens, syncretistic blends with their pagan religions, hence voodoo, Santeria, Candomblé, and such blends amongst Africans and their descendents in the Caribbean and Brazil and, and similar stuff amongst Mexicans, Amazonian and Peruvian Indians, etc.

    In Protestant Third World countries e.g. Barbados, not so much. No ‘saints’ to replace veneration of their old gods with, analogous to them (‘patron saint of x’ standing in for the African or Indian ‘god of x’). Ditto African Protestants; I’ve known many African ones, and they’re ultra-orthodox, more faithful than their Western counterparts; e.g. African Anglicans, from Nigeria, Uganda, etc. reject homosexuality completely.

    I salute those, and see them as my brothers – as they certainly are (and not because I’m mixed-race, half-brown myself, but because of our shared faith).

     
  13. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 3:36 pm

    Lumping together all members of any given race is as absurd as lumping together all whites; a Maltese is different from a Swede, and similarly, a Japanese is different from a Burmese hill tribe member; the same is true for Africans, Amerindians, Pacific Islanders, and so on. And the differences in religion and corresponding differences in culture have an impact; a pagan Congolese is more similar to a hill-tribe Cambodian than he would be to a Somali or a Senegalese Muslim from his own continent and race…

     
  14. sfcton

    July 25, 2014 at 4:30 pm

    I’ve stomped all over Africa, never noticed any of them being orthodox. I do remember the people all having charms, totems, special meals, places etc. Now Africa is a big place but I always go with what I have witnessed vs what is reported.

    Early European Christians had the same thing going on at some point. For how long? I don’t know but I reckon there’s a reason why the Christian West has been blessed more then any other Christian AO.

     
    • Will S.

      July 25, 2014 at 4:40 pm

      I’ve never been to Africa, but I’ve known many Africans in Canada, and AFAIK, none of them were into pagan practices, and from their testimony, they were pretty orthodox; I noticed one fellow’s virulent condemnation of homosexuality embarrassed some of the white evangelicals in our group, who rolled their eyes. They are traitors to the faith, IMO. He is not.

      ‘AO’?

      Anyway, yes, our European ancestors were once heathens, and some of them killed Christians when they felt threatened by them, as in the martyrdom of Boniface, by the pagan Frisians, after he burned down their sacred tree…

      Thankfully, other than maintaining some heathen customs, Europeans otherwise largely became orthodox Christians, other than some Scandinavians who apparently kept their folk religion Asatru alive, and it is now having a resurgence, alas…

       
  15. Will S.

    July 25, 2014 at 4:46 pm

    I don’t doubt your experiences – and I go by personal experience and personal witness and knowledge above media reports, too. And I have heard and read that paganism is very much alive in Africa. Missionaries there have a lot of work to do. On the other hand, the faithful ones there are now sending out missionaries themselves, e.g. this Pentecostal-type / charismatic denomination

    The West is now a mission field; and African churches themselves are sending missionaries here.

    And some faithful Western Anglican churches are looking into coming under foreign Anglican churches based in Africa, Latin America, and Pakistan; in fact, I believe a handful have already done so…

    That’s a weird reality to get used to, but it is the case…

    The future of the church, as a whole, may be overwhelmingly non-white and foreign…

     
  16. Eric

    July 27, 2014 at 9:34 pm

    Will:
    Interesting set of verses.

    Isaiah 36: I think that would appeal to modern Churchians, if they read in context as the Assyrians being the liberated Proletariat overthrowing traditional civilization.

    Ezekiel 23: Could be depicted by Churchians as the delights of thug-chasing, which Patriarchy and their priesthood was denying to ‘liberated women’

    Psalm 137: The Churchians here may read this a prayer longing for the day when abortion would be a ‘right.’

    Since all other histories are being rewritten, why not the OT? LOL

     
  17. Will S.

    July 27, 2014 at 10:10 pm

    @ Eric: You’re scaring me! LOL. 🙂

     
  18. Caelan McKenzie

    July 29, 2014 at 7:42 am

    The Eastern Orthodox church makes a particular point of singing Psalm 137 in its entirety during Matins in the 3 sundays leading up to Great Lent. The captivity and suffering of the exiles in Babylon is seen as a type of the suffering of each Christian as they live in a sinful world and system that mocks them and does its best to distract them and drag them away from their salvation. The “little ones” in verse 9 are the temptations, distractions and cares of this world that Babylon constantly spawns and throws in our path and/or smuggle into our lives, to try and derail us.

    Happy is the Christian who hates sin as much as the exiles hated Babylon that he ruthlessly destroys it wherever he finds it in his life.

    I don’t have exact quotes from the Holy Fathers for this (and can inquire further if necessary) but that is roughly how it was explained to us earlier this year before we sang it for the first time.

     
  19. Will S.

    July 29, 2014 at 9:16 am

    Oh yeah? Awesome!

    Interesting interpretation; I had no idea anyone saw it as having such a secondary level of meaning. But that makes sense. I like it! I believe you; you don’t have to find quotes, unless you’d like to share some for interest’s sake; your call.

     

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