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A new pointless modern translation of the Bible

01 Jun

Other than to make its publishers money, no doubt:

A Christian publishing house has recently unveiled a new translation of the Holy Bible labeling itself “most modern King James translation in 30 years.”

Known as the Modern English Version, this English translation of the Bible was produced by Charisma House and officially launched last Friday.

Tessie DeVore, executive vice president of Charisma House, said in a statement last week that the translation strove to be as literal as possible.

“To Bible readers who value biblical truth, the MEV literally translates God’s Word in a way that preserves the message, but remains readable for today’s world,” said DeVore.

“Because of this, we anticipate that the MEV will have broad ecumenical and consumer acceptance.”

Jason McMullen, director of ministry services at Charisma, told The Christian Post that his company felt it was time for a new translation.

“In concert with scholars we felt now was the time and more importantly we believe the Lord felt it was time. The King James has meant a lot to so many for so long and to have it updated in fresh language is truly something special and timely,” said McMullen.

“The translation team began their work in 2005 and completed in 2013 and the translation came to us mostly done. We know this was something the Lord orchestrated for the benefit of His church and we consider an honor to publish the MEV.”

The MEV Bible takes after the King James Version, also known as the Authorized Version, which was the first official English translation of the Bible.

On a website devoted to the MEV, publishers had a chart comparing certain verses of the Bible and how they were rendered in various popular translations.

For John 3:16, the MEV translation rendered it “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.”

This is similar to the KJV, save that the MEV translation used “whoever” instead of “whosoever”, “believes” instead of “believeth”, and “eternal life” instead of “everlasting life.”

Really? That’s all? What’s the point? (Again, other than to make a quick buck, or rather lots of them.)

Don’t we have enough contemporary English translations of the Bible? I think we do. There are lots!

I hope and pray it doesn’t catch on; that the publishers’ optimism is misplaced.

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8 Comments

Posted by on June 1, 2014 in churchianity, evanjellyfish

 

8 responses to “A new pointless modern translation of the Bible

  1. Michael Schleyer

    June 1, 2014 at 8:53 pm

    I agree with the first sentence/link. It is absolutely ridiculous to compile and sell a “new translation” that barely changes some of the language which could be easily deciphered by most modern men with a decent elementary education.

    If it were truly a modern translation, I am sure it would have to include irreplaceable aspects of modern grammar and vocabulary such as hashtags and slang/ebonics!

     
  2. Will S.

    June 1, 2014 at 9:01 pm

    LOL, don’t give them any ideas! #YIKES 🙂

    The link was just to the news story; that sentence was my interpretation, which I can’t see any way other than to interpret this move thus. Money-grubbing bullshit.

     
  3. Dalphon

    June 2, 2014 at 3:04 am

    When I was young I got excited over the NIV. Older and I hope wiser, it’s KJV all the way for good. And if one has any trouble, Matthew Henry.

    I think you might have reason for hope: the zillion-and-growing translations seems like market fragmentation and parasitism. Each new translation might simply take smaller and smaller slices, on the average. That is my expectation.

    I took the NIV at advertised face-value when it came out; then there was some point where I realized hey, they’re still making more–revised NIV, this, that, etc. So the NIV isn’t then the new rock to stand for the next five hundred years.

    It took many years more to grasp the mercantilist connections. So that’s the score! So it is back to the KJV, the great and august. The one that connects with our past and culture. The one everyone before me read.

     
  4. Will S.

    June 2, 2014 at 3:13 am

    “I think you might have reason for hope: the zillion-and-growing translations seems like market fragmentation and parasitism. Each new translation might simply take smaller and smaller slices, on the average. That is my expectation.”

    Bingo; that was my thought too! 🙂

     
  5. Chris@QPC

    June 2, 2014 at 9:05 pm

    “The MEV Bible takes after the King James Version, also known as the Authorized Version, which was the first official English translation of the Bible.”

    Do they know any history? “Official” translation by who? The King of England. It’s my understanding that the KJV came about so the Church of England would have one common “authorized” translation, instead of many like Tyndale’s Bible, The Great Bible, Geneva Bible, and Bishops Bible. All of which were before the KJV.

     
    • Will S.

      June 2, 2014 at 9:45 pm

      Clearly, they don’t.

       

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