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Albertans choose pro-infanticide, pro-homo ‘rightists’, over pro-infanticide, pro-homo ‘rightists’

24 Apr

Probably not of much particular interest to my American and overseas friends, but oh well.

Albertans have re-elected the Tories.

Granted, they didn’t have much to choose from, in terms of ideology on social issues – Tweedledum vs. Tweedledee, really – but one was a tired old governing party, the other a fresh upstart which at least had some members willing to speak against gay rights – though they’re being blamed for the loss (not without reason; looks like Liberal voters crossed the floor and voted Tory, just to keep Wildrose out), naturally.

Damn, indeed.

Hey Albertan rightists – think your province is more conservative than Ontario?  At least we’ve never had two pro-infanticide, pro-homo women leaders of rightist parties duking it out, and the worse one winning.  At least we have clearer choices on economics, between our parties, even if they won’t touch social issues.  Y’all suck even worse than we do.

That’s because you never alternate parties in power, preferring to always elect long-term dynasties, for your entire history, thus far:

1905–1921 Alberta Liberal Party
1921–1935 United Farmers of Alberta
1935–1971 Social Credit Party of Alberta
1971–present Alberta Progressive Conservatives

Whereas we Ontarians only made that mistake once.

Dynasties become entrenched, and are hard to get rid of.

Y’all are pretty stupid, and you suck, too.

I’m sure glad I moved back to Ontario, after four years in Alberta.

Rant over.

 

44 responses to “Albertans choose pro-infanticide, pro-homo ‘rightists’, over pro-infanticide, pro-homo ‘rightists’

  1. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 2:21 pm

    Before he’d seen I’d posted this, Samson and I chatted on the last post about this:

    samsonsjawbone

    April 24, 2012 at 2:02 pm

    Off-topic: Will, I’m interested in your thoughts on the Alberta election, you having lived there and all. My take: it’s a victory (from 0 seats to 18 or so), and only seems like a defeat because of massively inflated pollster expectations; Wildrose was less successful than predicted mostly because of PC inertia and a failure to really sell their message. I disappointingly saw the National Post lead with a battery of articles claiming that people didn’t want to vote for “homophobes”, but I just can’t believe that *that* many people really care about the gay question (either for or against).

    Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 2:10 pm

    @ Samson: I favoured Wildrose till Danielle Smith revealed she was pro-choice and pro-homo – just like Alison Redford. Ever since then, I’ve hated both parties, though I still kinda wish the Tory dynasty had been crushed; they don’t deserve to continue governing, dammit. They’ve been in power too long.

    Yes, the Wildrose Party still did well. But they were expected to go from 0 to majority, which may be unrealistic for other provinces, but Albertans have a history of doing that sort of thing, at least occasionally.

    Frankly, if Albertans want to vote for dead unborn babies and fags ‘marrying’, I don’t see why they don’t just vote Liberal, and be done with it. Except Albertans never return a party to power, having turfed them; they’re too vindictive and moralistic and proud to do so, to change their minds…

     
  2. samsonsjawbone

    April 24, 2012 at 2:24 pm

    As I said, I think Albertans just weren’t ready to trust a new party yet. The voters were “conservative” in the literal sense. What do you think about this theory, popular in various places, that Alberta politics has been altered by the influx of liberal Easterners?

    I’m sure glad I moved back to Ontario, after four years in Alberta.

    I’ve learned that Ontario is more conservative (in places) than it seems to outsiders; it’s just that Toronto skews things. And even then, I mean, check out what’s been going on with Rob Ford and his refusal to attend homosexual events – I’ve found it so encouraging. Either he really has a problem with the homosexual agenda, or thinks pretending he does is an election-winner.

     
  3. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 2:41 pm

    “As I said, I think Albertans just weren’t ready to trust a new party yet. The voters were “conservative” in the literal sense.”

    That’s true; hence why only four parties have governed, once each, in long single dynasties, since Alberta’s creation as a province in 1905.

    “What do you think about this theory, popular in various places, that Alberta politics has been altered by the influx of liberal Easterners?”

    Quite possible; almost nobody I met in Calgary was a native Albertan. Between immigrants from elsewhere, and an Eastern influx, certainly that’s possible.

    And who are being targeted by this ad:

    Not white men! (Never mind the token honkey boy…)

    “I’ve learned that Ontario is more conservative (in places) than it seems to outsiders; it’s just that Toronto skews things. And even then, I mean, check out what’s been going on with Rob Ford and his refusal to attend homosexual events – I’ve found it so encouraging. Either he really has a problem with the homosexual agenda, or thinks pretending he does is an election-winner.”

    Exactly; outside the GTA and the 905 belt, this province is pretty conservative; there’s a reason why the Tories have been elected so often throughout our history.

     
  4. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 2:45 pm

    Actually, let me amend that: almost nobody in Calgary was a native Calgarian; there were many from elsewhere in the province; but, there were tons of immigrants and new arrivals from the east, and even from B.C.

     
  5. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 2:53 pm

    And yeah, Rob Ford shows that in spite of Toronto’s liberalism, a redneck Tory can win there. So there is hope for Ontario. Woo-hoo!

     
  6. Chris

    April 24, 2012 at 4:09 pm

    Will.

    One party dictatorships are functional. Until they get corrupt — but I think it was Lord Acton who said power corrupts.

    Beside, it is cold there. Really cold. the Daughter lives next door (Manitoba) and was raised in Oshawa, and she finds it hard. It is those -40 days… and last week I think it was 8 above. (We both speak Celsuis). And I find Ontario far too cold.

     
  7. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 4:19 pm

    Manitoba is actually two provinces over from Alberta, Chris, with Saskatchewan in between. Not sure what the temperature has to do with anything (BTW, we use Celsius, too), unless their brains freeze, preventing proper thinking…

    “One party dictatorships are functional. Until they get corrupt — but I think it was Lord Acton who said power corrupts.”

    And that’s just it – they may start out well, but don’t give them a break to regroup and get fresh blood, now and then, and they become downright awful… Best to do what sane people, in sane places, do, and alternate between different groups of bastards, sorry, parties, periodically, to prevent any one party from becoming too entrenched. Albertans are fools for not doing so, and have been since 1905.

     
  8. The Man Who Was . . .

    April 24, 2012 at 5:00 pm

    The only reason to vote Wildrose, which I did, was their promise to get rid of the Alberta Human Rights commission and the odious Section 3 of the Human Rights Act and their promising not to put all school curriculums in the province including religious schools under the Charter.

    But other than that they are pretty much the same.

     
  9. The Man Who Was . . .

    April 24, 2012 at 5:07 pm

    I also thought Danielle Smith’s absolute refusal to throw her socially conservative candidates under the bus was admirable. Cost her the election. We will see what she does next time round though.

    I do think we should be willing to work with libertarians on a case by case basis if they really are willing to let us be. But, of course, we should remember that they’re not really on our team.

     
  10. The Man Who Was . . .

    April 24, 2012 at 5:13 pm

    In general though, I think the default position should be to not vote. I certainly have not and would not vote for Harper, and any future vote for Smith is highly contingent.

     
  11. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 5:19 pm

    @ Thursday: “The only reason to vote Wildrose, which I did, was their promise to get rid of the Alberta Human Rights commission and the odious Section 3 of the Human Rights Act and their promising not to put all school curriculums in the province including religious schools under the Charter.”

    That is a good reason, certainly.

    I lived out in Alberta, from 2002-2005, and I voted for the Alberta Alliance in the one provincial election during that time. They were more decidedly socially conservative, as were the SoCreds; I’m sorry the new party formed out of the ashes of those two isn’t so much.

    “But other than that they are pretty much the same.”

    Exactly.

    “I also thought Danielle Smith’s absolute refusal to throw her socially conservative candidates under the bus was admirable.”

    It was; but…

    “Cost her the election. We will see what she does next time round though.”

    I think Publius is right; re: outfitting her MLAs with ‘choke chains’; the so-cons in her party will be scapegoated, and shut up. Hopefully they won’t stand for that, though.

    “I do think we should be willing to work with libertarians on a case by case basis if they really are willing to let us be. But, of course, we should remember that they’re not really on our team.”

    Agreed; the problem is, so few libertarians are true libertarians, of the principled, Lew Rockwell type; all too many of them are really just neo-cons who want a bit more social freedom for themselves, but consider progressive dogma on sexuality to be correct, and worthy of pushing on others…

     
  12. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 5:24 pm

    @ Thursday: “In general though, I think the default position should be to not vote. I certainly have not and would not vote for Harper, and any future vote for Smith is highly contingent.”

    Ditto; I discussed my non-voting federally, and only occasionally provincially, here (I haven’t voted federally since 2000).

     
  13. samsonsjawbone

    April 24, 2012 at 5:44 pm

    @Thursday:

    In general though, I think the default position should be to not vote. I certainly have not and would not vote for Harper, and any future vote for Smith is highly contingent.

    I appreciate these opinions, Thursday, since you seem usually to keep anything other than the theoretical to yourself.

    I also thought Danielle Smith’s absolute refusal to throw her socially conservative candidates under the bus was admirable. Cost her the election.

    Did it cost her the election? That is the mainstream media’s line, of course.

    I do think we should be willing to work with libertarians on a case by case basis if they really are willing to let us be. But, of course, we should remember that they’re not really on our team.

    Glad to see I’m not the only one who thinks precisely this way. As far as I’m concerned, libertarianism is a species of liberalism, but I do agree that in the present context simply being *left alone* is as much as we could ask for.

    @Will:

    all too many of them are really just neo-cons who want a bit more social freedom for themselves, but consider progressive dogma on sexuality to be correct, and worthy of pushing on others…

    I read a very good take on libertarians recently – a comment by Thursday, in fact, on Mencius Moldbug’s blog:

    Libertarians like Will are often such hyper-individualists that hate informal restrictions on themselves, such as those imposed by religion or social stigma, as much or more as they do formal government restrictions and therefore often end up as de facto supporters of the latter when a choice is forced on them.

    Libertarians like Paul hate formal government restrictions, but mainly because they interefere with more informal, organic social groups. They happily concede that people are inherently social and that there are going to be significant impositions on our individuality as a result of that. They just don’t want the state, with all of its immense coercive power, backing up any particular social vision.

     
  14. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 5:52 pm

    @ Samson: I agree with that old comment of Thursday’s, too. I like the Lew Rockwell, paleolibertarian types; I can’t stand the Reason Magazine crowd and their ilk.

    Back during the Iraq War, there were even so-called libertarians, like Brink Lindsey, joining the neo-cons in supporting the War! What kind of libertarianism is that? The same type of thinking, no doubt, as the late Christopher Hitchens held to, curse him.

     
  15. Free Northerner

    April 24, 2012 at 8:08 pm

    Damn is right.

    Oh well, Alberta has another election in 4 years.

    “I do think we should be willing to work with libertarians on a case by case basis if they really are willing to let us be. But, of course, we should remember that they’re not really on our team.”

    As a libertarian I agree. The right, whether libertarian, so-con, paleo-con, or capitalist, needs to work together because at base, what our enemies would do to us is much worse than what we’d to to each other.

    “Back during the Iraq War, there were even so-called libertarians, like Brink Lindsey, joining the neo-cons in supporting the War! What kind of libertarianism is that?”

    I supported the war. i wanted the Iraqis to have freedom. That’s a pretty good reason. Of course, since then my views on war have changed. I’ve become more isolationist as I’ve realized that the west no longer has the will and fortitude to actually change things.

     
  16. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 8:26 pm

    The West also lacks the moral authority to dictate to the rest of the world, till it gets its own house in order, if then; personally, as far as I’m concerned, the rest of the world isn’t our responsibility, and can go hang, for all I care. As I said yesterday, charity begins at home. I don’t mind if people choose to donate to help others elsewhere, but I sure as hell don’t want my tax dollars spent on such, so long as there are people in our own land, in need.

     
  17. Will S.

    April 24, 2012 at 8:47 pm

    That is, of course, a libertarian view. I have some libertarian views; on war, and on other things – see here and here, for instance.

     
  18. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 2:32 pm

    I can’t believe I missed this. Excellent article.

    @ Samson and Will

    “Quite possible; almost nobody I met in Calgary was a native Albertan. Between immigrants from elsewhere, and an Eastern influx, certainly that’s possible.”

    Ahh… yes. This reminds me of Cylde Wilson’s observation of how both immigrants and carpet-baggers are changing the political landscape of North Carolina. Rather unfortunate.

    @ Free Northerner

    “As a libertarian I agree. The right, whether libertarian, so-con, paleo-con, or capitalist, needs to work together because at base, what our enemies would do to us is much worse than what we’d to to each other.”

    I don’t know the situation in Canada, but in America, it will not work. Capitalists just want money and profits and therefore can be members of either the Left or the Right. They tend to be socially liberal. The Neo-Cons have kicked Paleocons like me out of the political mainstream and are wedded to the Proposition Nation and abstractions like equality and freedom as opposed to a concrete nation bound together by a common culture and faith. They also are socially liberal by Paleo standards. Paleocons and libertarians tried to make a common cause, but unfortunately that failed: http://www.chroniclesmagazine.org/2010/06/23/nazis-and-other-delusions-a-response-to-hoppe/

    Sorry, but the only thing I can see from this is that we paleos have got to stick together. I have more of a common cause with Canadian paleoconservatives like Will S, Gerry T. Neal, Samson(?), European Paleocons like Srdja Trifkovic, and Jewish Paleocons like Paul Gottfried than I do with American Neo-Cons, Libertarians(with some exceptions), or Capitalists(with some exceptions).

     
  19. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 2:39 pm

    Will, that video pissed me off. I am fucking tired of liberals making videos full of annoying leftist betas and ugly leftist whores. I am sick and tired of it. We need to bring back some testicular fortitude back into this thread:

    To any leftists reading this thread: Fuck you, fuck queers, fuck open borders, and fuck yeah to guns.

     
  20. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 2:40 pm

    @ Svar: “I can’t believe I missed this. Excellent article.”

    Thanks, Svar.

    Ahh… yes. This reminds me of Cylde Wilson’s observation of how both immigrants and carpet-baggers are changing the political landscape of North Carolina. Rather unfortunate.

    ““Quite possible; almost nobody I met in Calgary was a native Albertan. Between immigrants from elsewhere, and an Eastern influx, certainly that’s possible.”

    Ahh… yes. This reminds me of Cylde Wilson’s observation of how both immigrants and carpet-baggers are changing the political landscape of North Carolina. Rather unfortunate.”

    I actually clarified the statement you quoted there, slightly, just a bit further down, but yes, Alberta has been transformed, I’m sure, by a fair number of arrivals from other provinces, as well as immigrants.

     
  21. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 2:45 pm

    @ Svar: Oh, I know, that leftist video was revolting. Sadly, it appears to have worked; it’s fairly clear that Tories received votes from Liberals, whose share of the total vote dropped dramatically from its usual level.

     
  22. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 2:49 pm

    Like those three ads, Svar. Kick-ass! 🙂

     
  23. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 3:36 pm

    “I do think we should be willing to work with libertarians on a case by case basis if they really are willing to let us be. But, of course, we should remember that they’re not really on our team.”

    Damn straight, Thursday. Some paleo-libertarian types like the late Joseph Sobran are on our team, but the vast majority of libertarians should be kept at an arms length.

     
  24. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 3:42 pm

    “I actually clarified the statement you quoted there, slightly, just a bit further down, but yes, Alberta has been transformed, I’m sure, by a fair number of arrivals from other provinces, as well as immigrants.”

    Ahh, I see. Well, I suppose that the immigrants and the arrivals from other provinces weren’t very helpful to the Albertan cause anymore than they are to the North Carolinians.

    Take for example, Texas. Texas is a bastion of Middle American conservatism but it has those two little leftist cancer cells called Austin and Houston. Why? Carpet-baggers from Cali for the former and basically half of Mexico for the latter(as well as carpet-baggers).

     
  25. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 4:36 pm

    Exactly, Svar; it’s probably similar to Texas, in that regard.

     
  26. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 4:38 pm

    @ Svar: Speaking of North Carolina, I have a piece about a development there, over at HM, here.

     
  27. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 5:59 pm

    “Exactly, Svar; it’s probably similar to Texas, in that regard.”

    It’s especially egregious in the case of Austin in that the the carpet-faggers took the capital. Austin is markedly different from a town like Amarillo, Lubbock, Waco, or even just Ft. Worth(the first three being small-towns and the last being big and rich, but still conservative).

    RE: HM

    You could cross-post and that way both Patri and HM can have a win-win situation. More traffic for them and even moar Will S. around.

     
  28. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 6:07 pm

    No, because I generally do different kinds of posts at the two different places. But I always authorize pingbacks, when I link related posts here and there together, so that helps.

     
  29. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 6:10 pm

    Oh yes, I forgot HM is not actual articles but commentary on miscellanous links.

     
  30. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 6:17 pm

    Ya oughta visit more often. 😉

     
  31. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 6:20 pm

    Exactly, Will. I really do, but I keep forgetting. Could you like put a widget on Patri that shows recent articles from HM?

     
  32. Will S.

    April 25, 2012 at 6:41 pm

    I dunno; maybe. Or you could just subscribe, and have them sent to your inbox. 😉

     
  33. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 6:53 pm

    “I dunno; maybe. Or you could just subscribe, and have them sent to your inbox. ;)”

    Good idea. That thought never occured to me; after all, it’s not like I’m a scientist or anything. I’ll do that right away.

     
  34. samsonsjawbone

    April 25, 2012 at 9:57 pm

    Samson(?)

    Hey, come on, man. No question mark needed.

     
  35. Svar

    April 25, 2012 at 10:45 pm

    I wasn’t sure if you identified as a paleoconservative, Samson. What are you? Red Tory or High Tory?

     
  36. samsonsjawbone

    April 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm

    Actually, I’m not sure I identify as anything besides “Christian”. But I share most (all?) typical paleoconservative beliefs.

     
  37. Will S.

    April 27, 2012 at 7:23 pm

    I myself am a non-voter; paleoconservative / Red Tory describes my political inclinations, more than it does any actual voting record; I haven’t voted federally since the 2000 election.

     
  38. Svar

    April 27, 2012 at 10:39 pm

    Politically, Samson, I identify as a Roman Catholic Paleoconservative and religiously I consider myself to be an orthodox Catholic(with some traditionalist and sedevancantist leanings, but I am basically a JP2/B16 Catholic). I am not a Southerner, but I sympathize deeply with Southerners because they are my neighbors and friends.

    I would say my beliefs fall very closely in-line with that of Thomas Fleming of Chronicles. He is a paleoconservative, Roman Catholic, and an overall good man. My number one role model.

    In general, I would say Chronicles sums up my beliefs; everything else is too liberal or too extreme.

    Will, I have been eligible to vote for about a year, but I have decided to not register. I will not vote in any national election, though I do think I will vote in local elections and participate in local politics, maybe state.

     
  39. Will S.

    April 27, 2012 at 11:37 pm

    @ Svar: I have occasionally, in recent years, voted in local elections; once that I remember, at least. And I did recently vote in a provincial election, and will consider doing so again, if there’s a decent protest vote, i.e. one I could theoretically get behind, were they to actually win; in this case, it was a libertarian, whose party’s platform I found much agreement with, despite my philosophical inclination against libertarianism, for the most part.

     
  40. Will S.

    April 29, 2012 at 11:59 pm

    Publius’ further thoughts on the Alberta election, here.

     

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